wetheurban:


SPOTLIGHT: Palestinian Artists Turn Smoke Into Thought-Provoking Illustrations
Using the photos of smoke created by the devastating Israeli missile strikes, Palestinian artists Tawfik Gebreel, Bushra Shanan, and Belal Khaled, have sketched powerful images based on the silhouette of the smoke. 
Read More wetheurban:


SPOTLIGHT: Palestinian Artists Turn Smoke Into Thought-Provoking Illustrations
Using the photos of smoke created by the devastating Israeli missile strikes, Palestinian artists Tawfik Gebreel, Bushra Shanan, and Belal Khaled, have sketched powerful images based on the silhouette of the smoke. 
Read More wetheurban:


SPOTLIGHT: Palestinian Artists Turn Smoke Into Thought-Provoking Illustrations
Using the photos of smoke created by the devastating Israeli missile strikes, Palestinian artists Tawfik Gebreel, Bushra Shanan, and Belal Khaled, have sketched powerful images based on the silhouette of the smoke. 
Read More wetheurban:


SPOTLIGHT: Palestinian Artists Turn Smoke Into Thought-Provoking Illustrations
Using the photos of smoke created by the devastating Israeli missile strikes, Palestinian artists Tawfik Gebreel, Bushra Shanan, and Belal Khaled, have sketched powerful images based on the silhouette of the smoke. 
Read More wetheurban:


SPOTLIGHT: Palestinian Artists Turn Smoke Into Thought-Provoking Illustrations
Using the photos of smoke created by the devastating Israeli missile strikes, Palestinian artists Tawfik Gebreel, Bushra Shanan, and Belal Khaled, have sketched powerful images based on the silhouette of the smoke. 
Read More

wetheurban:

SPOTLIGHT: Palestinian Artists Turn Smoke Into Thought-Provoking Illustrations

Using the photos of smoke created by the devastating Israeli missile strikes, Palestinian artists Tawfik Gebreel, Bushra Shanan, and Belal Khaled, have sketched powerful images based on the silhouette of the smoke. 

Read More

(via ccaannddyyfloss)

“Hawaii once had a rat problem. Then, somebody hit upon a brilliant solution. Import mongooses from India. Mongooses would kill the rats. It worked. Mongooses did kill the rats. Mongooses also killed chickens, young pigs, birds, cats, dogs, and small children. There have been reports of mongooses attacking motorbikes, power lawn mowers, golf carts, and James Michener. In Hawaii now, there are as many mongooses as there once were rats. Hawaii had traded its rat problem for a mongoose problem. Hawaii was determined nothing like that would ever happen again…Society had a crime problem. It hired cops to attack crime. Now society has a cop problem.”
— Tom Robbins, Still Life With Woodpecker  (via floralnymph)

(via ccaannddyyfloss)

theroguefeminist:

daughterofmulan:

Take a facet of crime, and then look at television shows/movies that feature those criminals as protagonists.

White mobs.

image

White pirates.

image

White serial killers.

image

White political corruption

image

White drug dealers

image

I mostly want to talk about this as a TV phenomenon, but pick a crime, any crime, and Western media has probably made a movie/TV series/play/etc. with a white person that romanticizes the criminal activity. No matter what, a white person can do whatever terrible crimes and still have a TV/movie fanbase that loves them.

When you see black or brown people committing crimes on screen, you are to see them thugs and criminal masterminds and people to be beat down.

When you see white people committing crimes on screen, you see a three-dimensional portrait of why someone might commit that crime, how criminals are people too, and how you should even love them for the crimes that they commit because they’re just providing for their families or they’ve wronged or they’re just people and not perfect. This is particularly a luxury given to white male characters, since there few white female criminals as protagonists.

If and of the above shows were about black or brown folks, there would be a backlash of (white) people claiming that TV and movies are romanticizing criminals and are treating them too much like heroes and that it will affect viewers and encourage violence and “thuggish” behavior. And yet fictional white criminals get to have a deep fanbase who loves these white criminals, receive accolades and awards, get called amazing television that portray the complexities of human nature. Viewers of these characters see past the atrocious crimes and into their humanity, a luxury that white characters always have while characters of color rarely do. The closest that mainstream TV has come to showing black criminals as main characters is probably The Wire, and even then, the criminals share equal screen time and equal status as main characters as the police trying to stop them.

The idea that crime can be so heavily romanticized and glorified to such a degree is undoubtedly a privilege given to white characters. The next time you hear someone talk about Dexter Morgan or Walter White in a positive way, it may be an opportunity to rethink how white people can always able to be seen as people no matter what they do, while everyone else can be boiled down to nothing but a criminal.

I always felt extremely uncomfortable with this trope because, not only is it racist, but it tends to feed into the already too common propensity society has to humanize, romanticize and exonerate irrevocably terrible white men. Like if you’re a white man and you commit awful crimes, you will likely go down in history as a legendary celebrity and historical figure

(via youngmajinbuuu)

unbloss:

lepetitchatblanc:

best thing I’ve ever read

NEVER FORGET

holy shit

(via flannelandsatin)

martinhsu:

A most curious dream
Wonderland, acrylic and cel vinyl on wood, 48” x 20” triptych
More art info here
In Dreams, new works by Martin Hsu
martinhsu:

A most curious dream
Wonderland, acrylic and cel vinyl on wood, 48” x 20” triptych
More art info here
In Dreams, new works by Martin Hsu
martinhsu:

A most curious dream
Wonderland, acrylic and cel vinyl on wood, 48” x 20” triptych
More art info here
In Dreams, new works by Martin Hsu
martinhsu:

A most curious dream
Wonderland, acrylic and cel vinyl on wood, 48” x 20” triptych
More art info here
In Dreams, new works by Martin Hsu
martinhsu:

A most curious dream
Wonderland, acrylic and cel vinyl on wood, 48” x 20” triptych
More art info here
In Dreams, new works by Martin Hsu
martinhsu:

A most curious dream
Wonderland, acrylic and cel vinyl on wood, 48” x 20” triptych
More art info here
In Dreams, new works by Martin Hsu
martinhsu:

A most curious dream
Wonderland, acrylic and cel vinyl on wood, 48” x 20” triptych
More art info here
In Dreams, new works by Martin Hsu
martinhsu:

A most curious dream
Wonderland, acrylic and cel vinyl on wood, 48” x 20” triptych
More art info here
In Dreams, new works by Martin Hsu
martinhsu:

A most curious dream
Wonderland, acrylic and cel vinyl on wood, 48” x 20” triptych
More art info here
In Dreams, new works by Martin Hsu

martinhsu:

A most curious dream

Wonderland, acrylic and cel vinyl on wood, 48” x 20” triptych

More art info here

In Dreams, new works by Martin Hsu

(via nobodycaresbuti)

thebluelip-blondie:

my white protesters please remember that you’re rarely at the same risk we are when you stand up for what is right

(via culturedsoul)

“I regret being scared. I regret wasting time thinking I wasn’t good enough, that I didn’t deserve a seat at the table. You do belong and your voice is worthy. Say it to yourself in the mirror every morning if you have to, but don’t ever forget it.”

Jenna Wortham, reporter, New York Times, to Buzzfeed. 39 Pieces Of Advice For Journalists And Writers Of Color.

Buzzfeed asks twenty established writers what advice they’d give to those breaking into the industry.

Here are the questions:

  • What piece of advice would you, as a writer of color, give to burgeoning writers/journalists of color?
  • What do you know now about being a writer of color that you wish you’d known when you first started?
  • Is there anything you did as a writer starting out that you now regret?

Read through for the answers.

(via futurejournalismproject)

“Gratitude unlocks the fullness of life. It turns what we have into enough, and more. It turns denial into acceptance, chaos to order, confusion to clarity. It can turn a meal into a feast, a house into a home, a stranger into a friend.”
— Melody Beatitie (via awelltraveledwoman)

(via femmeinnest)

kingjaffejoffer:

-imaginarythoughts-:

blackpoemusic:

Exercising power.
Even if you lose.
Liberate your right to be.

Photo: Domicanan Republic

This is the hardest picture I’ve seen

http://activehistory.ca/2013/10/one-island-two-worlds-conflict-between-the-dominican-republic-and-haiti/

(via culturedsoul)

“The sun, with all those planets revolving around it and dependent on it, can still ripen a bunch of grapes as if it had nothing else in the universe to do.”
— Galileo Galilei (via jtotheizzoe)

(via flannelandsatin)

manufactoriel:

Fields of Colors, by Edith Peterson-Watson

(via popcornsundays)

nprbooks:

Libraries in many big cities often serve as de facto homeless shelters — a place for people living on the streets to find quiet and warmth — and it can make others, there to just check out books or videos, uncomfortable.

KQED’s Scott Shafer reports that’s why the San Francisco Public Library has hired a full-time social worker. She spends her days roaming the library floors, keeping an eye out for regulars who look like they could use her help. And sometimes she hires the formerly homeless patrons she’s helped, like Joe Bank, to do outreach under her supervision.

(via npr)

swanjolras:

thebrokenhunterandhisbrokenangel:

worldofdrakan:

its-heaven-nowadays:

More Macklemore, less Robin Thicke.

And yet a huge percentage of Tumblr hates him. Not trying to be confrontational, but could someone please explain to me why this is?

Because he is a straight white guy and Tumblr isn’t always right. 

oh my god if i have to see this post on my dashboard one more time

all right, okay. let’s talk.

last year on a slow day in law/society class, my teacher showed us a movie where charlize theron was one of the only female workers in a mine in minnesota. she experienced a fuckload of sexual harassment, ofc; it was when she started daring to complain about the sexual harassment that shit got really bad.

i remember watching charlize theron go through all these awful things, and i remember getting vaguely invested in her as a heroine; yeah, you go charlize theron, you continue to work despite these harassment and assaults, you stand up for yourself when people shun you in the community, etc

and there was this climactic scene where the miners’ union was having a meeting, and charlize theron was going up to complain about something or tell people she was suing the company or smth, i can’t remember, and she stood there in front of this huge crowd of angry men who were booing her and catcalling her and shouting the worst things at her and she’s getting really miserable

and then her father, who also works at the mine, goes up and says “hey, you’re all jerks, think of your mothers & daughters, would you treat them this way,” and the miners are like “oh wow charlize theron totally does deserve our support etc” and then the movie continues

but all i could think was— what, so they’ll listen to a man but not to the woman who’s actually affected? why doesn’t charlize theron get to save the day and be the hero? in a conversation about sexism, why is his voice more important than hers?

we’re not mad at macklemore. or— well, we are mad at macklemore, but we’re more mad at the system that prioritizes macklemore over actual queer rappers, over actual rappers of color, who have been saying exactly the same shit for decades and been ignored.

we’re mad at the system that gives more attention to straight allies than queer activists.

we’re mad at the system that only supports queer rights when they are quiet and polite and have cute graphics.

we’re mad at the system that makes macklemore a hero of of the queer struggle but doesn’t know marsha p. johnson’s name.

we’re mad at the system that will listen to macklemore when he comes to defend us— but won’t listen to us.

we’re mad at the system that has constructed itself to make damn certain that only straight cis white boys can be heroes.

it’s fuckin’ great that macklemore thought he was gay in third grade. but the system would rather give his third grade gay freakout the spotlight than our actual whole-life queer experiences— and that’s not okay.

(via culturedsoul)